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A new undercover investigation by Mercy For Animals Canada at an Ontario turkey factory farm reveals birds thrown, kicked and beaten by workers, crowded into filthy sheds, and left to die from festering, bloody wounds.
WHAT THE INVESTIGATION EXPOSED:
Workers bashing in the heads of turkeys with metal rods and shovels
Turkeys with festering infections, left to suffer without any veterinary care
Workers repeatedly choking turkeys and crushing their spines
  
CRUELTY CRITICS
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“The euthanasia practices depicted in the video I saw were inhumane; they did not result in immediate unconsciousness. It is not appropriate to kick, punch, or swing birds. This is gratuitous cruelty.”
Ian Duncan, PhD, Canada's leading expert on poultry welfare
“The euthanasia methods were clearly not acceptable and the industry needs to develop better methods. [Turkeys] must never be lifted by the ends of the wings and swinging the turkey is not acceptable.”
Temple Grandin, PhD, PAS
“This videotape exposes examples of animal abuse and neglect. There are clear violations of both the OSPCA Act and the Criminal Code of Canada.”
Mary Richardson, DVM
“The fact that these birds were killed in this brutal fashion in full view of the Barn Supervisor suggests that this is a standard of practice at this facility and not the actions of a rogue employee.”
Debi Zimmermann, DVM, PhD
“[T]he video sent to me ... contains some of the most severe abuse that I have yet witnessed.”
Sara Shields, PhD
“[T]he video ... demonstrates multiple acts of extreme cruelty to animals. The acts inflicted protracted and severe pain and suffering needlessly.”
Greg Burkett, DVM
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NATURE VS. FACTORY FARMS
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NATURE

In nature, male turkeys go to elaborate lengths to attract a partner. Courting males stride around woods and clearings, puff themselves up, strut with their tails fanned and wings lowered, and fill the air with exuberant gobbling.

FACTORY FARMS

On factory farms, turkeys have been bred to grow so large that they are no longer able to breed naturally. Males have their penises pinched by workers to collect semen. Females are pushed onto their faces, and forcibly inseminated.

NATURE

In nature, young turkeys spend up to five months near their mother’s side, listening closely to her calls to scatter, hide, or come back. At night, the babies huddle under their mother's wings for warmth and protection.

FACTORY FARMS

Turkeys on factory farms never get to meet their mothers or experience motherhood themselves. They never know the protection and comfort of their mother's wings or the joy of exploring the woods and fields with her.

NATURE

Wild turkeys are excellent runners, and can also fly and swim. They walk, explore, and forage from sunup to sundown. In the evening, wild turkeys fly up into the trees to roost, hopping from branch to branch.

FACTORY FARMS

Domestic turkeys have been selectively bred to grow so large and quickly that they become crippled under their own weight. Many suffer from painful bone defects, hip joint lesions, crippling foot and leg deformities, and fatal heart attacks.
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